Sunday, 5 May 2013

Drumlins around Whiterock

It is 5 weeks since I nearly froze to death overnight at my 'old' caravan down at Whiterock.  As it is in a farmer's field with a fence around it to keep the cattle out, I have to keep the grass cut very 4-6 weeks, so my nephew helped me today to do this.


View to the right with the Yacht Club in the distance
This caravan may not suit everyone but I love it as I am the only one there, so I have total peace of the country however I have the excellent views of the sea.  I don't have much in the way of facilities but again that is the charm of this for me.  After 30 years in this field, the caravan has sunk down a bit into the ground and the Ash tree in the corner of the site, just out of view have deposited a gum like substance over the roof which does not come off so now I don't have the wash the roof!!  There are always positives to any situation if you are prepared to look for them.  This is my 'retreat' and I love it.  I didn't have time to bird watch much but I did see Shelduck and Redshank in the Bay.

This is a view from my caravan window to the left side of the Bay.



This is the view I have looking up the fields to the back of my caravan



Whiterock is in Country Down and is full of drumlins.  A drumlin, from the Irish word droimnin ('little ridge'), first recorded in 1833, is an elongated hill in the shape of an inverted spoon or half-buried egg formed by glacial ice acting on underlying unconsolidated till or ground moraine.  This is a photo I took a few years ago showing drumlins with some of the many islands in Strangford Lough.



                                                  Drumlins overlooking Strangford Lough
We travelled round by the coast road and just stopped once to watch a farmer ploughing his field.  There were dozens of Black headed Gulls following his tractor.  Watch the video.

2 comments:

  1. Now that's the sort of retreat I could happily stay at; for a very long time.
    It always amazes me how the gulls never seem to fall victim to the tractors they so closely follow.

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  2. I watched the Gulls for a little while and they really never went near the blades that turned the soil. Clever birds!

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