Friday, 3 March 2017

FRIDAYS HUNT and WEEKEND REFLECTIONS

I am linking with Friday's Hunt and Weekend Reflections and the prompt is letter I, Favourite and Nose!  Now, a few weeks ago members of Mount Stewart House were treated by Paul to a guided walk around the historic buildings in Newtownards associated with the Mount Stewart family and today I am showing you just a couple of the INTERESTING buildings.  More to follow (hopefully) next week.


At the east of High Street in Newtownards the Market Cross was built in 1636 but was destroyed by Commonwealth troops in 1653. The original building was less than 11 feet tall and octagonal in shape with a low door and staircase leading to the roof. The present replacement building was finished in 1666. Its conical roof was probably used as an office or shelter for the towns night watchmen. Towns people say that the Cross used to "flow with wine" at the birth of a royal baby. 


This is one of my NOSE images and through its mouth flowed the wine and the people came and drink for 3 days!! Now that's a party i would say!.  The Market Cross features a number of carved gargoyles and is topped by a weather vane.


The story goes that the cross was the centre for local commerce and a bargain struck within its shadow was legally binding.




The first town was built when the Norman adventurer John de Courcy arrived in the Ards area in 1177. Following Norman practice, the conquered area was divided into small counties, one of which was the ‘County of Blaethwyc of the Ardes’, and it was in this county that the New Town of the Ardes was built.

In the late eighteenth century, the town was redesigned with a new centre based around Conway Square, named after (Mount Stewart) Alexander Stewart’s daughter-in-law, Lady Sarah Frances Seymour-Conway. So the market moved from The Market Cross to this area in front of the Town Hall where it is still held every Saturday.


Paul took us into the Town Hall and much to everyones surprise showed us into a VERY tiny cell.  I hope you can read the above.  The cell was so small I could not get back far enough to take a good shot of the marks on the stone left by the prisoners. (below).  


Looking up I took this shot of the ceiling in the cell.  


 This is another NOSE image and this time Paul took us into The Old Priory.



Finally, and just to fit into the meme, an ISLE shot taken when Paul took us into St Mark's Church  but this and the Priory stories will have to wait for another day, however I hope you found this post INTERESTING.   


I leave you with a REFLECTION wing mirror shot of a windd swept tree
taken along Strangford Lough.

And a FAVOURITE?  Well I will leave you to pick this week.

Many thanks for visiting and also leaving comments.

18 comments:

  1. Love the gargoyles.
    An excellent reflection too - and I can't get over how green it is.

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  2. Très jolis pierres & monuments ;-)
    Céline & Philippe

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  3. Such an interesting post - loved reading all the history. Have a great weekend.

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  4. SO interesting! So the cross building is not in use anymore I assume. Just for tradition, and to mark the center of town for the markets etc. And you said the old one used to be even shorter! I would think the night watchman would have had to fortify himself with lots of drink in order to stay in such a tiny place all night! I cannot imagine how awful it was being in this jail! Just to have to look at that weird tiny ceiling would give me shivers.

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  5. Very interesting, Margaret!

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  6. Interesting post, Margaret

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  7. Interesting shots and such beauty.

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  8. Thanks, Margaret. A most interesting set of pictures, and description.

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  9. What a party that must have been. You can just imagine people fighting to get to the wine.

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  10. Damn you, Oliver Cromwell.

    Great photos.

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  11. Fascinating to read about the market cross and its history. I am glad I was never stuck in a tiny cell like that - although the ceiling is very interesting. Lovely stained glass window in that church, although I think an "isle" is a small island (like the ones in the distance in your last photo) and the church has an "aisle."

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  12. A really fascinating post about this place! Great photos! I particularly loved the shell motif with the iron gate! And the ceiling of the cell...how odd! Very interesting post about history!

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  13. Margaret, "I"nteresting architectural details, thanks for sharing.

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  14. Great post! I really enjoyed seeing this very interesting town.

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  15. Margaret, I found it very interesting. I hope you visited on a market day. That's something we like to do. Generally we find something delicious to eat.
    I'm sorry that I am late coming here, been pretty business but moly spinning my wheels.

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  16. What a fascinating tour! How I would love to visit such an historical place. The shot of the ceiling is amazing! Thanks so much for joining in Friday's Hunt!

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