Thursday, 12 May 2016

Ballynoe Stone Circle in 3D - An unusual fence!!

Ballynoe Stone Circle is a stone circle situated in the small hamlet of Ballynoe 2.5 miles south of Downpatrick, County Down, Northern Ireland. Photographed by David from IrishSights.   CLICK shot to upload, then I suggest you put it into toggle mode (bottom R).  This makes it much larger.   Then CLICK and hold and you can move the Stone Circle in ANY direction.


It is a large and complex site which appears as a large circle of over 50 closely spaced upright stones, some as much as six feet tall, with some small gaps, surrounding a space about 110 ft across. Two of the fallen stones have cavities which could be artificial cup-marks. The stones of the outer circle are nearly all composed of local Silurian grit, but a few are granite erratics.

The site is the result of long development and a late Neolithic to earlier Bronze Age date range is likely, as it seems to span several different building phases.

The mound was excavated in 1937-38 by Dutch archaeologist, Dr AE Van Giffen, The excavation concentrated on the mound, finding stone cists containing cremated bones.

I think this is amazing nowadays how we can easily see sites like this.  

I do hope you enjoyed this post and thanks for your visit and David for permission to show this.

I am linking this post with GOOD FENCES.

Also many thanks for all who leave comments.

19 comments:

  1. It may be me but the image has gone all soft when in toggle mode. I can't imagine anyone would use this app if that is what it does.

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    1. Woorked perfectly on my post. YOu need to click the image again when you see that softer image and then it will be clear adn perfect and you can move it all around.

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    2. Got it now, as usual I didn't read the instructions.

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  2. Hello Margaret, the stones are a cool sight to see. I had no trouble using the toggle mode.
    Thanks for sharing! Happy Thursday, enjoy your day!

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  3. How clever. Toggling made my tummy uneasy though. I was probably too fast. And when I flipped it upside down - accidentally - my tummy went with it.
    I should add that I am really, really prone to motion sickness.

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  4. I'm fascinated with those old stone circles. If only they could tell us the stories!

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  5. Oh my goodness this is incredible!

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  6. very unique. the 3d turn made it feel like spinning a turtle shell. :)

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  7. It is truly an amazing sight! Thanks for the link too! Happy fences!

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  8. I love these old stone circles, we went to Castlerigg in Cumbria last spring and in my younger days I went to Stonehenge but my personal faves are the ones on the Orkneys.............

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  9. Similar in some ways to Stonehenge ... makes you wonder if it was the same group or how they overlapped in history. This is awesome and I love the toggle app ... it gave me many different perspectives. As always, Margaret on the cutting edge :)

    Andrea @ From the Sol

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  10. Always interesting to see sights like this.
    Thank you

    All the best Jan

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  11. Fantastic Margaret, you have done it.

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  12. Wow that would be very cool to see for real.

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  13. This is fascinating. Thank you Margaret. The question you asked about the film strip, I have a program on my computer called Paint Shop Pro. It allows me to work in layers. I can put layer 1 (the film strip) onto layer 2 (my photograph). If you had Photoshop they might be able to do this too but I know nothing of this program. If you had Paint Shop Pro I could tell you how. The same program allows me to add my other photos onto each section of the film strip.

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  14. Looks much like the talayots we are seeing in Menorca right now. Adios for now Margaret. Back in the UK very soon.

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