Thursday, 16 April 2015

GOOD FENCES - Copeland Island (Part 3)

In this post which is from the Copeland Islands, I have included 2 methods we use to catching and then ringing birds although as I said yesterday, that actually didn’t happen last weekend due to bad weather so the mist nets was furled and then taken down before leaving.  



There are probably about 50 Wren on the Island and they were making  a lot of noise over the weekend.


I saw a flock of Meadow Pipits (6)  and like the Wren above all where photographed through the kitchen window due to the bad weather.


Mist nets are typically made of nylon mesh suspended between two poles.  When properly deployed, the nets are virtually invisible. The grid size of the mesh netting varies according to the size of the species targeted for capture. Net dimensions are approximately 1–2 m high by 6–15 m long. The use of mist nets usually require specific permits specified by country specific wildlife protection legislations. Mist net handling requires training and skill to avoid injury to the captured birds or bats. A 2011 research survey found them to have a low rate of injury while providing high scientific value. 


Funnel traps have a narrow entrance into which birds may be lured or driven and the entrance typically leads to larger holding pen or corral (which also gives them the name of corral trap). Funnel traps can be very large and a particularly well-known large scale form was devised in the German bird observatory at Heligoland and are termed as a Heligoland trap.




The Pheasant  was in the Heligoand trap but as it was not set it was able to walk out again.



On Sunday morning we woke up to heavy rain and a lot of wind however by 11.30am the rain stopped and the other 2 people that were with me on the island decided to do some work on one of the traps that needed repaired while I washed all the dishes we had used over the weekend and cleaned all the rooms in the house. 


This is David, the Duty officer and his son Phillip working on the the trap.  
Can you see the start of a fence in this shot?  



There is a small area fenced off and I think it is to protect Orchids that are growing there so these are some close up shots.





I am sure you can see in the shot above with the white ship in the distance, well I have a closer shot of it below probably going over to Liverpool or Cairnyan.







The land in the distance is Scotland and if you look very carefully on the far left you can see a wind farm.  Of course there is a round fence at the top of Mew Lighthouse.  A blogger asked if they had Mew Gulls on Mew Island, well in the UK we call a Mew Gull a Common Gull and these Gulls nest mainly on Lighthouse Island.(the island I was staying on which is one of the three Copeland Islands.

I hope you enjoyed seeing more of the Copeland Island and tomorrow I will show you shots taken of the only pond on the island.
I am linking this post with GOOD FENCES.


Many thanks for your visit and also to all who comments.

36 comments:

  1. Cold and wet weather for ringers, beautful images Margaret.

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  2. Good morning, Margaret,
    What a wonderful place to stay.
    A beautiful day today.

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  3. Hello Dearest Margaret; It is interesting to see these traps from the Copeland Island with beautiful scene. Loved to see Wren, Meadow Pipits, well happy to see the Pheasant as they are national bird of Japan :-)
    Sending Lots of Love and Hugs from Japan to my Dear friend, xoxo Miyako*

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  4. Hello Margaret, it is a beautiful island. I love the lighthouse and the lovely views of the water.. Great photos, have a happy day!

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  5. This looks like such an amazing place to visit. Wild and wonderful. How fascinating to see how the birds are captured and then released. Such an adventure

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  6. Brilliant photos Margaret! I found the info on the bird traps very interesting. Also liked the composition on that first photo and beautiful scenery and pretty birds. Thank you for another enjoyable post.

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  7. hello Margaret! I did not realise that you are a fellow blogger from N. Ireland!! Lovely to 'meet' you! We love to spend time along the shores of Belfast and Strangford loughs and Groomsport is a favourite!
    Thank you for sharing wonderful views and teaching us about those birds nets. I didn't know until now!

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  8. Nice set of picks, Margaret.

    Wrens do make a wracket!
    ~

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  9. i love the old stone walls. :) i have no doubt that netting and ringing takes skill and care to avoid injury to the birds. thanks for sharing, margaret!

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  10. Beautiful images, and what an interesting way to trap birds.

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  11. I never really understood exactly what a Heligoland trap was as I'd never seen one before unlike mist nets. I think I prefer the Heligoland to be honest

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  12. Hi Margaret, You get to visit so many beautiful places... Looks GORGEOUS!!!!! Love seeing the lighthouse.... Beautiful!!!.. AND your wren looks so much like 'our' Carolina Wrens here. Such sweet little birds -although they love to 'try' to build nests in our garage... ha

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  13. Exquisite photos, love those boots, and great source of working and necessary fencing. Great views to enjoy.

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  14. Your posts are always so interesting. Thanks for explaining how the traps work. The island is beautiful

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  15. Stunning pictures...showing such details!
    Lori

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  16. This was very interesting. Learning about the birds you see and such is quite fascinating. Such a wonderful looking place. I love the lighthouse and the stone walls and of course the various birds.

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  17. I love the streamlined ship, and the cute little wren with his beak wide open. I have never seen birds caught this way, only bats. I see the sundial on the stone table that I saw from your window on a previous post!!

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  18. Hi Margaret, These pictures are great. You captured some of the special feeling that one must experience when they are there in person. Very nice post!

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  19. Your posts are always beautiful and interesting. I enjoyed see how the birds are captured.
    Have a great weekend!

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  20. That looks a very interesting place to visit Margaret.

    peter

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  21. What a wonderful experience that must have been to be out on this island!

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  22. Margaret, the wren is making good use of the rope railing. Thanks for sharing.

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  23. Love the heavy line that tops the stone wall!!! And the wren perched on the moss covered line too!!

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  24. Hi Margaret, I enjoyed seeing this part of the world through your eyes. Have a great weekend.

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  25. What a lovely post to enjoy! Thanks



    ALOHA from Honolulu,
    ComfortSpiral
    =^..^=

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  26. I enjoy the pictures and the creative angles.

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  27. I enjoyed these views (and fences) of Copeland Island.

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  28. It's a lot of work but I know you enjoy it. The lighthouse is beautiful as are all of your photos! Enjoy your week!

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  29. Hi Margaret, Wonderful post and great information and learning here. Love your photos. This has to be a very interesting place to stay and discover.
    Thank you for sharing.
    CM

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  30. These are absolutely wonderful images. Beautiful area and scenery.

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  31. such a beautiful island. love the last image of the lighthouse.

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  32. Beautiful pictures...it was almost like a virtual trip for me... :-)

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  33. Wonderful place to visit. Very interesting !

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  34. A fascinating post this week Margaret. I have a brother-in-law who is a bird bander and heand his group use mist nets I think.

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  35. what a treat!!! i had a pheasant in my yard, several winters in a row. he didn't come back this winter ;(

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