Thursday, 13 November 2014

GOOD FENCES - Mistle thrush - Turdus Viscivorus

I was travelling down a country road and spied this Mistle Thrush on top of  telephone pole so this series of shots were taken from the car at a very a awkward angle.  Sometimes people cannot tell the difference between this thrush and the Song Thrush so today I will endeavour to do this.


The Mistle Thrush is a large thrush, it could only be confused with its cousin, the Song Thrush. Mistle Thrushes dwarf Song Thrushes, they can be up to 10cm larger.  They are a slightly less common breed and like Song Thrush, numbers increase during winter with continental birds moving in to escape harsh winter conditions.


Adult males and females are alike.

Mistle Thrush is less numerous than Song Thrush and prefers more open habitat.  During breeding in Summer we only have two ‘spotted’ thrushes to worry about, Mistle and Song.  In the winter we have 2 more.  The Fieldfare and Redwing.


Mistle Thrush is a large thrush, larger than Blackbird and huge compared to Song Thrush, it measures close to 30cm and is therefore a third larger than Song.


Upperparts and tail are dull greyish brown, not as rich as Songs.


The rump is paler than the rest of the upperparts.


Tail is long, dark and has white edges and obvious white corners.


The head appears pale with plenty of white patches, often looks ‘open’ faced.
It tends to stand very upright and will often search for food in the shadows.



Mistle Thrush shows more pale markings on the wings and the underparts are not as buffy as on Song Thrush.


The Spotting on the underparts are rounded and it often appears to show a dark smudging on the side of the breast.  Bill is dark with paler lower mandible, eye dark, legs pale.


Undertail is white with some dark flecking.  
In flight the bird appears large, fairly long tailed and 
the underwing coverts are white.


Breeding for the Mistle Thrush takes place from February to May whereas the Song is March –June.

Juveniles appear from April onwards and are similar to adults but upperparts more marked.


Lifespan is 3 years for both Thrushes.  

I know this is not much of a fence, just the top of it, 
however I hope you enjoyed the post.

I am linking this post with Tex's meme -  GOOD FENCES

Thank you for visiting and also leaving your lovely comments

43 comments:

  1. Thanks Margaret I'll try and remember. Good shots.

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    1. H Adrian Thanks for comment and I hope the info will help.

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  2. Very good description and a very nice set of photos - Eulas Bradford

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    1. HI Eulas Thank you for your kind comment

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  3. The breast is delicately beautiful, like tiny brushstrokes, each one in a perfect place.

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    1. HI Ginny Yes God is a wonderful creator. Thanks for your comment.

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  4. lovely photos Margaret, enjoyed the information as always, love their belly markings, like little brown waves...

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  5. Nice. That reminds me of the general appearance difference between the goldfinch and the evening grosbeak. (not technically, but then I'm not a birder. I just feed them.)

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  6. It's beautiful Margaret.
    Sad to read of such a short life span tho.

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  7. These photos make him almost palpable like you could feel his warmth through his feathers and a little heart beat. Lovely shots.

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  8. I LOVED seeing the Thrush! You took some really nice photos of him!! So glad I got hooked back up with your blog.

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  9. Amazing photos. We used to see this bird in the mountains of NC...they are a beautiful color. I hope you have a chance to visit me today. I'm sharing a rare sighting and hope to get some input! Hugs, Diane

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  10. such a pretty bird! thanks, margaret!

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  11. A beautiful bird - and your photos re great! We don't have this bird in California. It must be pretty big if it is larger than a blackbird.

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  12. Wow, what a view, of a post and a bird. Life is beautiful, all around us, especially the little things we often overlook!

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  13. Well if these were taken from your car, I can't imagine how beautiful they would be if they hadn't been! These are just great and I really like the interesting wire on that fence too!

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  14. A fine series of close up shots which are excellent. I like the sharpness and the fine detail you captured.

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  15. You got some beautiful shots of this thrush even if he was on top of the telephone pole. The information is very interesting.

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  16. Those thrushes are so hard to tell apart....even here in the US! What a tricky bird to ID! Great catpures!

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  17. Really awesome shots! Love hearing about the differences between the two birds.

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  18. What a great looking bird, the spots are so cool looking. I loved your series.

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  19. the mistle-thrush sits nicely on the fence :)

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  20. Since using my camera, i dont think i have got a good photo of a Thrush, i dont think they are as common as years ago.

    peter

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  21. I am not likely to see either thrush - but so grateful for the education and the beauty. Thank you.

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  22. Lovely bird! You're so lucky to see so many wonderful birds. I'm envious! :)

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  23. You found a very obliging Mistle Thrush there Margaret and made some great portraits. I find them to be vary wary and couldn't hope to take anything like as good pictures.

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  24. Pretty thrush with those spots! Here in my back yard I get visits from the wood thrush. Sometimes he most get so hungry that I have seen it on my sunflower seed feeders.

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  25. what a pretty bird and beautiful images!! i.d.-ing many birds can be difficult, there are such slight variations!!!!

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  26. A delightful series of this pretty bird Margaret. Great shots!

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  27. I like the colors and patterns on his chest area.

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  28. its a lovely bird. he has pretty markings.

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  29. A very pretty Thrush! I love the beautiful and distinct patterns. We have two here in Washington State, Swainson's and Varied Thrush, which I see only in the winter. They are such sweet birds.

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  30. They always seem to be such friendly birds to me somehow! Great shots.

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  31. Amazing photos and interesting information. Vivid details in this series of photos. Thanks for sharing, Margaret!

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  32. It would take me more than three years to get that many bird photos, let alone so many of one bird. Well done.

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  33. Margaret, what grand photos you captured of this beautiful Mistle Thrush! Happy Weekend to you~

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  34. I always remember seeing flocks of Mistle Thrushes around our local power station....................

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  35. Very pretty bird, and it was very tolerant of having it's image taken. :)

    Thanks for stopping by to comment on my gate and fence.

    Lindy

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  36. What a lovely bird and captured beautifully!

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