Wednesday, 26 March 2014

Wompoo Fruit-Dove

I was on the first flight into Cairns, Queensland after cyclone Yasi in February 2011 and it was a few days later that I spied this bird in the garden.  It is a Wompoo Fruit - Dove.  It is fairly rare for it to be on the ground however it probably was trying to find food.


 The dove measure up to 14 to 18 inches, but are generally far smaller in northern regions. It has purple plumage around its neck, chest and upper belly.  Its lower belly is yellow and has a green underparts.  The sexes look similar and the juveniles have a duller and greener plumage compared to adults. Notwithstanding their bright plumage, they are hard to see amongst the forest canopy, thanks to their unobtrusive, quiet habits.  Their call sounds like wollack-wa-hoo and often sounds very human.



 The Wompoo Fruit Dove can be seen in large flocks where food is abundant.  The birds feed off fruit-bearing trees in rain forests such as figs. They also occasionally eat insects. They can eat large fruits whole and are able to acrobatically collect fruit of trees and vines. They do not like to travel long distances, preferring to stay in their local area and make use of whatever fruit are in season. 

The diet of this species was extensively studied in the Port Moresby area.  Despite their small size, they are able to swallow fruits of a diameter of about 2 cm in spherical fruit.


Major food items included: figs, fruit of cinnamon trees, palm fruit, Annonaceae fruit, such as Ylang-ylang (Cananga odorata) and Polyalthia - whenever available.


Breeding times will vary according to weather conditions. The nest is sturdily constructed from forked twigs not high from the ground. Both sexes help in the construction of the nest. One white egg is laid and the parents share the incubation and care of the chick. In the event, that the chick dies, the doves will attempt to have a second offspring in the same season.





I know the photographs are not up to great quality however I was delighted to have seen this bird and I never saw it again.  Most of my Australian friends could not believe I had it in the garden so it was fortunate I had taken these shots of it to show them!

Thank you for visiting.

Many thanks for comments left on any of my posts.

I amlinking this post with WILD BIRD WEDNESDAY

19 comments:

  1. they're magnificent doves; I'd love to see one for myself too some day

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  2. Never heard of this dove. Thank You for sharing.

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  3. Beautiful looking dove Margaret. Seeing is believing, your friends must be envious

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  4. It's a colourful bird Margaret, sure puts our 'grey' ones to shame. And how lucky were you to get a chance to see it? Not too sure about it's name though!...[;o)

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  5. Another birdie first . . . thanks Margaret!

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  6. That's a very impressive-looking dove, Margaret. I should think it could cause excitement in anyone's garden! I guess it's moments like this that give one the urge to return somewhere.

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  7. Love the 6th shot. Really beautifully framed!

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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  8. wow! just stunning color combinations!

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  9. This is a new one for me. So glad you shared it. Enjoy your day!

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  10. Some day I will see them in feathered reality. Until then - thank you for your photos.

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  11. Here is a bird I have never heard of. But it is very pretty, as are most doves.

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  12. Awesome photos of this colorful Dove! Great sighting. Have a happy day!

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  13. wow, that is one colorful dowe. The head gives it away. Or you might think it is a parrot. :)

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  14. Between you and Stewart I am beginning to feel like I don't know anything about birds ... every time you post, you have pictures of a bird (and in this case a beautiful bird) that I have never heard of before. It is hard to believe that we live on the same planet, albeit on opposite sides. This is an amazing bird and I can't see anything wrong with the quality of these pictues. Thanks for another lesson in the seemingly endless number of Australian birds, Margaret. Love this one ...

    Andrea @ From The Sol

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    1. HI Andrea If I thought that I would stop writing about birds, I do hope you have learned something from seeing other birds from other countries. Remember I live in Northern Ireland and have only visited Australia albeit quite a number of times and these are photographs i took over the years since my daughter and family moved there. I will run out of Australian shots!!! Now they are in Malawi for 2 years and I hope to visit them sometime perhaps next year. The reason I started an Australian bird on Wednesday's was because it was the only way I could remember to join in on Stewart's meme!!!!! You work is superb and I just wish I had more time to experiment on some of my shots but i am always trying to catch up on my photographs. Thanks for visiting so often and for your comments.

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  15. Thanks for the interesting information (and pictures) about this bird. I must admit that I am not familiar with this species. I thought your photos were quite good.

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  16. I've never seen such a colorful dove. I'm so glad you got to see one.

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