Saturday, 5 October 2013

Redshank

For my Saturday post today I am showing you the

Redshank - Tringa totanus. 
Redshanks are in the family of sandpipers and are long-legged creatures, slender, graceful and upstanding, but of deceptively modest size, their length not much bigger than that of a blackbird (10.8 – 11.2ins).  Long, reddy-orange legs give the Redshank its common name, whilst the bill is lengthy, straight and also reddy coloured.  Their plumage though, is of more subdued hue - essentially brown above, and white with darker mottling below.

 

They weigh 3.88ozs.  Notice they have an eye ring.


They have a typically fast, erratic flight, white inner trailing wing edges and rump which is unmistakable. And if that is not enough, the Redshank's agitated, far-carrying cries - tlu-leu-leu - should clinch identification.

 
With good reason, Redshanks were once known as ‘yelpers of the marsh’, for the slightest hint of provocation – the threatening outline of a distant carrion crow, a dog or walker on the horizon, even a pony straying a bit too close for comfort - will usually bring the same noisy, babbling Redshank response.



Many Redshank are resident in the UK.  However others breed in Iceland.  Habitats are marches and wet grasslands.



Many Redshanks apparently pair for life.  Males use early morning, stiff winged display flights to impress the female in their lives, and also to send a signal of aggression to other males.


Redshank nests are, though, often incredibly well concealed, no more than shallow depressions lined with grass stems and leaves beside a tussock or other protective vegetation. Overhanging, intertwined leaves and stems often form a canopy, with access through an entrance at the side.

Four eggs are normally laid. Young Redshanks hatch after around 24 days, complete with a covering of down, and are immediately mobile, fledgling after a further 25-35 days.



Predatory crows, however, habitually pose a threat, hanging around the breeding grounds, waiting patiently for adult Redshanks to leave the nest unguarded.



Juveniles may have greenish/yellowish legs.



They find their food mostly by sights and not probing in the mud or sand.











A group of sandpipers has many collective nouns including a "cluster", "contradiction", "fling" and "time-step".




A Redshank enjoys a stretch of the wings.
 

Redshanks have been joined by Godwits and Black headed Gulls.
I hope you have enjoyed this lovely wader, the Redshank.
Thank you for visiting.

I am linking with The Bird D'Pot

58 comments:

  1. Excellent images and an informative narrative.

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    1. HI Adrian Glad you enjoyed both images and information. Thanks for comments. Have a great weekend.

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    1. HI Thanks for comment and glad you liked the orange legs of this wader.

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  3. Although they are a relatively common bird, the sight of a Redshank always brings a smile to my face. However, I'm not used to seeing them gathered together in such numbers as are you are showing (so beautifully!!) here, Margaret.

    A fascinating account of the character of this species - thank you!

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    1. HI Richard This really was a small group that day, recently I have seen perhaps 200 together. Glad you enjoyed both images and information. Thanks for comments. Have a great weekend.

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  4. Even living on the banks of the River Severn i can never get very close to any costal birds, i must give a try. I like the last but one photo, spot on.


    peter

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    1. HI Peter Well that will give you a challenge then. Glad you enjoyed both images and information. Thanks for comments. Have a great weekend.

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  5. Lovely set of Redshank images Margaret. I don't think I have seen them congregate quite like that before.

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    1. HI Roy This was a small group, at present I have seen about 200 together. Glad you enjoyed both images and information. Thanks for comments. Have a great weekend.

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  6. The lovely colour of Mink and they are so beautiful~

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    1. HI Mary Mink really describes their colour well. Glad you enjoyed both images and information. Thanks for comments. Have a great weekend.

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  7. Great shots of these lovely little waders Margaret.

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    1. HI Keith Thanks for solving my 'no sound' problem. Glad you enjoyed both images and information. Thanks for comments. Have a great weekend.

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  8. Interesting and informative post Margaret, I've never seen this many gathered so closely together in one place before, and they're all being quiet!...[;o)

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    1. Hi Trevor I had them hypmotised!!! I said, " photo shot" and that did the trick. This is only a small group, recently I have seen about 200 together. Glad you enjoyed both images and information. Thanks for comments. Have a great weekend.

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  9. Beautiful captures of your Redshanks! They remind me of the Purple Sandpipers I see here.

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    1. HI Eileen Out Purple Sandpiper are small and dumpery. Glad you enjoyed both images and information. Thanks for comments. Have a great weekend.

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  10. you got some nice up close photos of them Margaret

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    1. HI Carole Glad you enjoyed both images, close ups and information. Thanks for comments. Have a great weekend.

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  11. Thanks Margaret, you've taught me a few things about the Redshanks.

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    1. Hi Bob Glad you enjoyed both images and information. Thanks for comments. Have a great weekend.

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  12. Beautiful pictures Margaret.
    My favorite photo is number 17, very good sharp and nice attitude, exposure is perfect.
    Happy weekend, Irma

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    1. HI Irma Glad you enjoyed both images and information and for pointing out no 17 was your favorite. Thanks for comments. Have a great weekend.

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    1. HI Tex Glad you enjoyed the images. Thanks for comments. Have a great weekend.

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  14. no hiding out for these guys, with those bright orange legs!!

    beautiful close up shots!!

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    1. HI Debbie The sun was on them so the orange showed up well. Glad you enjoyed both images and information. Thanks for comments. Have a great weekend.

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  15. They are waiting.

    For, you, me and others.

    For a headline.

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  16. HI They were trying to stay on that jetty as the wond was up adn the waves were coming in. Hope you liked this wader. Thanks for comment.

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  17. Some lovely shots of one of my favourite and most frustrating waders Margaret. If something sets all the waders into flight just as you are about to press the shutter, you can bet it's a Redshank.

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    1. HI Phil You are spot on there. One squeek from them and allother are up and away! Glad you enjoyed both images and information. Thanks for comments. Have a great weekend.

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  18. These are an interesting little birds that I do not know. And they have the ability to look different in almost each picture. I think that is partly because when they hunker down, you really can't tell how tall they are or see their long legs. I love their long beak with the two colors on it.

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  19. HI Ginny Every Saturday I thnk you are learning about a new bird,, that's cool. Glad you enjoyed this little wader and thanks for cmment.

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  20. I enjoyed your info and your pictures. A delight.

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    1. HI Sparkle Glad you enjoyed the bird and information. Thanks for comment.

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  21. I liked the third-from-the-last shot, of the single bird wading. It shows off the detail of the color nicely. They ARE a pretty bird, and the orange legs and feet are pretty nifty.

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    1. HI Linda Glad you enjoyed the thied from the last bird and information. Thanks for comment.

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  22. Those orange legs certainly are eye-catching.

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    1. HI Ruth Glad you enjoyed the orange legs of this bird. Thanks for comment.

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  23. An astonishing number of birds do mate for life don't they? And I loved the 'Yelpers of the Marsh' title. Big smiles - and thank you.

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    1. Hi EC Glad you enjoyed the bird and information. Thanks for comment.

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  24. What lovely little birds! I could watch them all day.

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    1. HI Betty Glad you enjoyed the bird and information. Thanks for comment.

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  25. Beautiful is the series of photos of the birds that have made!
    Greetings, RW & SK

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  26. HI RW & SK Glad you enjoyed this bird series and information. Thanks for comment.

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  27. I love the Redshank 'stretching its wings'!!! Perfect timing!!!

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    1. HI Anni Glad you enjoyed the Redshank and thanks for comment.

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  28. Their shanks truly are quite red so they are perfectly named. I wonder how they know that many mate for life. Someone must be tagging them?? Hmmm. Neat photos and tons of information.

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    1. HI EG Yes it is interesting to know which birds pair for life or not but it is never that straight forward as I havedone quitea bit of research on the subject. Glad you liked the images and information.

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  29. Wonderful photos of such a beautiful wader :) Excellent informative post Margaret :)

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    1. HI RR I am glad you enjoyed both the images and the information. Thanks for your comments.

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  30. Such cute little long-legged birds! I love the photo of the single bird stretching its wings.

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    1. HI Glad you enjoyed the post and especially theone sretching his leg. Thanks for comment.

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  31. Fabulous photos of these sweet birds!

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    1. Hi Gunilla Glad you enjoyed the images and thanks for comment.

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  32. so many great shots. I never manage to get that close to any f them. There is no doubt about where the name came from. :)

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  33. HI I am glad you enjoyed the Redshank and thanks for comment.

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