Saturday, 31 August 2013

Falconry at Carsibrook Castle

This post takes us back at Carisbrooke Castle where last time I showed you the Jousting (see Tuesday 27 August), however I am going to show you the Falconry display this time.  I only have a very short video at the end as the bird and his master never stopped moving so I decided stills were the wisest option.  He flew the Hawk first and then you will see the Peregrine being flown.


 The lady is red did all the commentary and she explained that these were totally wild birds and could not be fully trained.  This became very evident when the Peregrine decided not to return but look for his own food.   The master had to go up on a hill eventually and swing the lure and eventually he came closer and closer.  









This is a lure.  It is an object used in falconry, usually made of leather with a pair of bird wings or feathers attached.  A Falconer swings the lure round and round on a cord for the falcon to chase for exercise.  A lure also may be used as an object to train the falcon to retrieve.









This is the Peregrine Falcon.  

The peregrine falcon is arguably the fastest bird in the sky. Its streamlined body, powerful muscles and swept-back wing shape are perfect for fast flight.
During level flight, with motion generated by wing-beats alone, they can reach speeds between 40-60 mph. This is one of the fastest known speeds for level flight with only a few species of duck, wader and pigeon known to reach similar speeds in comparable flight.


Most species of wild bird will have many different flying styles which they use in different situations. Birds will reach different speeds during these different flight styles. Migrating birds will often have a fast and steady rhythm, often using the wind to assist them. General flight will be more pedestrian whilst display flights and predator prey interactions can result in short sharp bursts of fast flight. It is during aerial pursuit where extremely fast speeds are reached by both predator and prey and this is where the peregrine is in a league of its own.
Birds of prey often use a controlled dive known as a stoop whilst hunting. This hunting technique is amongst the most spectacular of wildlife behaviour across the animal kingdom.

The actual speed that a peregrine reaches in a stoop will be effected by the wind speed and duration of the dive, which will vary in every situation. Because of these variables there is not a confirmed top speed however it is thought that it is possible for a peregrine in ideal conditions to reach speeds of up to 200 mph which is phenomenal.
The forces that the peregrine is exposed to during a stoop are mind boggling. What makes it even more fascinating is that at the end of the stoop, this unique raptor is still able to deliver a controlled blow and to carry away the unfortunate victim.




All the birds below were at the masters tent and he said he would be flying one of the Owls in the afternoon, however we did not stay to see that as it was so hot and we were both dying of heat exhaustion!!








 Kestrel




I hope you enjoyed coming with me to see these beautiful birds.  It is not often you can see them at close quarters and to see them in action.


The very short video can be accessed at

 http://youtu.be/CPa0CKAH-No

If there is a black space below, click it and the video will appear.




Thank you for visiting and I hope you will return soon.

I am linking up with The Bird D'Port

34 comments:

  1. Such incredible birds, though I am ambivalent about falconry. My heart tells me that where-ever possible they should fly free...
    Hypocritically(?) I really enjoyed getting a closer look at them in this post. Thank you.

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    1. Hi ET Yes it is wonderful to see these birds at close quarters. Thanks for comments.

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  2. Marvelous post on these beautiful birds Margaret. What a fun event to attend and I always enjoy your videos at the end.

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    1. HI Denise Yes the whole day was great and I am not finishied with my posts on it yet!!! Glad you enjoyed seeing the birds at close quarters adn thanks for comments.

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  3. I always enjoy watching these birds. I'll have to visit a Falconry Centre before winter sets in.

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    1. HI Adrian
      Yes please do as I would like to see more bird shots of the event. Thanks for comments.

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  4. they are beautiful. 200 mph! wow!

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    1. HI Tex amazing speed these birds can reach up to. thanks for comment.

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  5. Your photos of these magnificent birds are amazing. I especially liked the one of the kestrel.

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    1. HI Linda Yes the Kestral was lovely but the background to shot these birds did nothing for them. Thanks for comments.

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  6. Great shots of these amazing birds and this interesting falconry demonstration! Love this!

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    1. Hi Jeanne So glad yu enjoyed thepost adn event. thanks for comments.

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  7. Great demo!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

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  8. Beautiful birds amazing demonstration. Great post and your photos are awesome, Margaret!

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    1. HI Eileen Many thanks for your kind commetns adn I am glad you enjoyed the photos.

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  9. You got some great close-up views and pictures there Margaret. Good video at the end there too.

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    1. HI Pphil Many thanks for your kind comments adn I am glad you also enjoyed the short video.

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  10. Fantastic shots- how beautiful!

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    1. Hi Terri Many thanks for your kind comments.

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  11. Wonderful post. What a spectacular event! The birds are beautiful.

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    1. es the event was amazing. thanks for commments.

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  12. Wow---that is awesome, Margaret. I love birds --and your photos are fantastic. Falcons are a favorite. In fact, the Peregrine Falcons nest in the North GA mountains --and they close the hiking trails and access areas to their nesting places in order to protect them. Isn't that just great???

    Thanks so much for sharing.
    Hugs,
    Betsy

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    1. HI Betsy Yes it is wonderful to be able to see birds at a closer distance especially in the wild. Thanks for yuor kind comments.

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  13. What an amazing opportunity to see these handsome birds! Have a lovely day!

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    1. HI Gunilla Thanks for comments and yes it was amazing.

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  14. What a wonderful series of shots! Love all the great feathers and faces!

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    1. HI Betty Thanks for comments and glad you liked F&F

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  15. Amazing and beautiful birds. The falcon's prey might never know what hit it!

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  16. Hi Pattis The Falcons talons are deadly. Thanks for comment.

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